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Wave Chart Term Definitions     References

Earthquake And Tornado Data Evaluation Computer Program Term Definitions


WAVE  CHART  TERM DEFINITIONS

Wave Chart X, Y, and Z axes - With the MICA program Earth location data referred to in this Wave Chart Term Definitions section, the Y dimension axis is roughly a line which lies in the Earth – sun orbital plane and which is drawn between the positions of the Earth in space on January 1 and July 1 of each year.  The X dimension axis is also in the Earth – sun orbital plane.  And it is roughly a line drawn between the positions of the Earth in space on April 1 and October 1 of each year.  The Z dimension axis is a line drawn perpendicular to the Earth – sun orbital plane.

Sun Gravity Strength – The inverse of the square of the daily distance between the sun and the Earth. = Constant / (Sun – Earth distance)^2.  Distance data were generated by the MICA program.   The sun gravity strength is strongest around the beginning of the year.  That is the time when the Earth is closest to the sun in its yearly orbit.

Moon Gravity - The inverse of the square of the daily distance between the moon and the Earth. =  Constant / (Moon – Earth distance)^2.  Distance data were generated by the MICA program.  The moon gravity is strongest once each month when its orbit takes it closest to the Earth.  It is also traveling at the greatest speed relative to the Earth at that time.  That date of closest approach changes a little each month.

Earth Velocity – Daily change in the three dimensional position of the Earth in space. = SQRT((Day2 X location – Day1 X location)^2 + (Day2 Y location – Day1 Y location)^2 +(Day2 Z location – Day1 Z location)^2).  Location data were generated by the MICA program.  The Earth is traveling with the greatest speed relative to the sun at the beginning of each year when it is closest to the sun in its orbit.  That time of closest approach changes slightly every year.

Earth Acceleration – Daily change in the three dimensional velocity of the Earth in space. = Day2 velocity – Day1 velocity.  Earth Velocity data from the previously discussed calculations were used.

Changes in Earth Acceleration - Daily change in the three dimensional acceleration of the Earth in space. = Day2 acceleration – Day1 acceleration.  Earth Acceleration data from the previously discussed calculations were used.  At least one other researcher refers to this acceleration change measurement as the “Impulse.”

Sun - Earth - Moon Angle (inverted) – Difference in degrees between the longitude lines which the sun and the moon were directly above.  The values were inverted so that high points are 0 degrees and low points are 180 degrees.  Synthetic longitude data were used.  The dots on the line are times which present theories propose represent higher probability earthquake triggering time windows.  This wave represents (roughly) the value of the angle formed by lines drawn between the centers of the sun and the Earth, and the centers of the Earth and the moon.

Moon - Gravity Point Angle (inverted) – Difference in degrees between the longitude line which the moon was directly above and the longitude of the location on the Earth’s surface where the combined gravitational pulls of the sun and moon was strongest.  The values were inverted so that high points in the wave are around 0 degrees.  Sun and moon gravity strength data from the previously discussed calculations were used.  Longitude data used in the calculations were generated by the MICA program.  Because the moon gravity pull on the Earth is about twice as strong as that of the sun the location of that combined sun and moon gravity point is I believe always within about 25 longitude degrees and 15 latitude degrees of the position of the moon in the sky.  Maximum longitude difference times are represented by low points in the wave.  Top points in the wider parts of the wave represent the times when the sun and moon are close to one another in the sky.  Top points in the narrower parts of the wave represent the times when the sun and moon are on opposite sides of the Earth.

Gravity Strength at the Sun - Moon Gravity Point – The daily strength of the combined gravitational pulls of the sun and the moon at the point on the Earth’s surface where they were strongest.  The average moon gravity value was defined as being roughly 2 times as strong as the average sun gravity value.  Sun and moon gravity strength data from the previously discussed calculations were used.  Longitude data used in the calculations were generated by the MICA program.

Solid Earth Tide – Difference between the sum of 2 successive Solid Earth Tide vertical displacement crests and the sum of 2 successive Solid Earth Tide vertical displacement troughs calculated for 180W longitude and 0N latitude. = The first data point would be (High tide1 + High tide2) - (Low tide1 + Low tide2).  The second data point would be (High tide3 + High tide4) - (Low tide3 + Low tide4) etc.  Solid Earth Tide data were generated with the Etgtab Version 3.0 computer program.

Sun Latitude – The latitude which the sun was directly above.  Latitude extremes are roughly 23N and 23S.  Latitude data were generated by the MICA program.  The displayed values are relative to the moon latitude extremes (26N and 28S).

Moon Latitude – The latitude which the moon was directly above.  Latitude extremes are roughly 26N and 28S.  Latitude data were generated by the MICA program.

Sun - Moon Gravity Point Latitude – The latitude of the point on the Earth’s surface where the combined gravitational pulls of the sun and the moon were strongest.  Latitude extremes are roughly 24N and 26S.  The average moon gravity value was defined as being roughly 2 times as strong as the average sun gravity value.  Sun and moon gravity strength data from the previously discussed calculations were used.  Latitude data used in the calculations were generated by the MICA program.  The displayed values are relative to the moon latitude extremes (26N and 28S).

Sun Latitude – The latitude which the sun was directly above.  High values are roughly 23N and low values are roughly 23S.  Latitude data were generated by the MICA program.

Geomagnetic Field Strength – Estimated Planetary K-indices from a U.S. government NOAA Web site were used.  These might be logarithmic rather than linear data.  If so then a point on the wave which is twice as high as another point would represent a geomagnetic field strength which is more than twice as strong as that of the lower point.


EARTHQUAKE  AND  TORNADO  DATA
EVALUATION  COMPUTER  PROGRAM  TERM  DEFINITIONS

       The signals which the information on the Data Web page are based on are believed to be Electromagnetic (EM) Energy Field Fluctuations which are linked in some manner with events taking place in earthquake fault zones around the world and also perhaps atmospheric and solar storms.

       The earthquakes in the tables show the latitudes and longitudes of fault zones which the latest version of the Earthquake And Tornado Data Evaluation Computer Program indicate might have been responsible for the signals.

       That computer program generates a probability number which indicates how well each EM signal matches each past earthquake in the program database.  Those are the Individual Signal Probabilities numbers in the tables on the Data Web page.  The program then combines all of those individual signal probabilitity numbers for all 90 earthquakes and lists them as the Pa: numbers on that page.  The Pd: numbers are the same as the Pa: numbers.  But they are calculated for only the 45 destructive earthquakes.

Lon  -  The earthquake longitude.  + = east.  - = west.

Lat  -  The earthquake latitude.  + = north.  - = south.

Pa:  -  The combined signals test probability rating for one of the 90 harmless or destructive earthquakes.

Pd:  -  The combined signals test probability rating for one of the 45 destructive earthquakes.

Angle -  The angle in degrees made by lines drawn between the centers of the Earth and the sun, and the centers of the Earth and the moon.  They show how many longitude degrees the sun was to the west of the moon in the sky at the time that the listed earthquake occurred or the time when the EM signal was detected.  With negative angles the sun was that many longitude degrees to the east of the moon in the sky.  However, latitude differences between the sun and moon positions are also added into that angle value.  And that can affect the value when the sun and moon are at about the same longitude in the sky.

Date  -  The earthquake date.

Mag  -  The earthquake magnitude.

D  -  A rating for how much damage the earthquake caused (0 = none or unknown, 9 = highly destructive).

Individual Signal Probabilities  -  The individual signal test probability ratings for each of the 90 harmless and destructive earthquakes.

Earthquake Data  -  The original earthquake records.  Most are NEIS or RedPuma data.

Signal #  -  Individual signal numbers.

Month  -  Month that the signal was detected.

Day  -  Day that the signal was detected.

Strength  -  Individual signal strengths.

Eql, Gl, Ml, Ci, La, and Sa are adjusted longitudes.  They have had -180, -90, 0, 90, or 180 degrees added to them so that their values are in the range 0W to 90W longitude degrees

Eql  -  adjusted earthquake longitude

Gl  -  adjusted combined sun and moon gravity location longitude (the adjusted value for the location on the Earth’s surface where the combined gravitational pulls of the sun and moon was strongest based on their positions in the sky relative to one another)

Ml  -  adjusted moon longitude

Ci  -   adjusted ocean tide crest and trough longitudes (all 4 averaged together) from the Christmas Island area 10.4S 105.7E

La  -   adjusted ocean tide crest and trough longitudes (all 4 averaged together) from the Los Angeles, California area 33.7N 118.3W

Sa  -   adjusted Solid Earth Tide crest and trough longitudes (all 4 averaged together) from northwestern South America 0N 75W

ORIGINAL EM SIGNAL DATA

Signal number  -  Signal number.

Detected  -  Date that the signal was detected.

Type  -  Type of EM signal.

Strength  -  Signal strength.

Wrn  -  Believed to be earthquake fault zone activity related signals.

Sub  -  Signal data sent to me by other people.

Tor  -  Believed to be severe weather related signals.

Angle -  The angle in degrees made by lines drawn between the centers of the Earth and the sun, and the centers of the Earth and the moon.  They show how many longitude degrees the sun was to the west of the moon in the sky at the time that the listed earthquake occurred or the time when the EM signal was detected.  With negative angles the sun was that many longitude degrees to the east of the moon in the sky.  However, latitude differences between the sun and moon positions are also added into that angle value.  And that can affect the value when the sun and moon are at about the same longitude in the sky.

Gl, Ml, Ci, La, and Sa are adjusted longitudes.  They have had -180, -90, 0, 90, or 180 degrees added to them so that their values are in the range 0W to 90W longitude degrees

Gl  -  adjusted combined sun and moon gravity location longitude (the adjusted value for the location on the Earth’s surface where the combined gravitational pulls of the sun and moon was strongest based on their positions in the sky relative to one another)

Ml  -  adjusted moon longitude

Ci  -   adjusted ocean tide crest and trough longitudes (all 4 averaged together) from the Christmas Island area 10.4S 105.7E

La  -   adjusted ocean tide crest and trough longitudes (all 4 averaged together) from the Los Angeles, California area 33.7N 118.3W

Sa  -   adjusted Solid Earth Tide crest and trough longitudes (all 4 averaged together) from northwestern South America 0N 75W

Location of the signal observer  -  Country where the signal was detected


REFERENCES

MICA – Multiyear Interactive Computer Almanac 1990 – 2005 Version 1.5 Astronomical Applications Department, U.S. Naval Observatory http://aa.usno.navy.mil/AA Published by Willmann-Bell, Inc.

ETGTAB Version 3.0 – Solid Earth Tide data generation computer program created by (the late) H.G. Wenzel, Geodaetisches Institut, Universitaet Karlsruhe, Englerstr. 7, D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany, http://www.gik.uni-karlsruhe.de/~wenzel/etgtab30/

Earthquake Data were obtained from U.S. government and/or RedPuma Web sites.

Geomagnetic Field Strength Data were obtained from a U.S. government Web site.

High Yield Nuclear Test Data were obtained from the Oklahoma Geological Survey Observatory Catalog Of Nuclear Explosions. http://www.okgeosurvey1.gov/level2/nuke.cat.html



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