A Citizen's Proclamation
The Use of Force in Defense of Liberty

I, the undersigned sovereign citizen of one of the several states comprising the united States of America, do hereby make the following proclamation regarding the use of force against government or institutional tyranny in the defense of liberty:

A moral imperative was established by the united States Declaration of Independence which recognized that mankind is endowed with unalienable rights which derive, not from the state, nor from the president, nor from congress, nor from any legislature and not from any man-made institution, but rather from their Creator. This recognition is the essence for which our forefathers fought the British in a bloody revolutionary war. These founders established that citizens themselves are sovereign; that government is a creation of these sovereign citizens and their sovereign states; and that government exists as the guarantor of those rights, not as the source of dispensation of those rights.

The Constitution of the several states established this moral imperative in law in the form of the Bill of Rights. Therein, certain rights, which represented a more thorough (but not exhaustive) list of rights, which are not to be infringed by government, are enumerated. These rights, thus enumerated, include:

  1. freedom of religion and the free exercise thereof.
  2. freedom of speech.
  3. freedom of the press.
  4. the right to assemble.
  5. the right to petition for redress of grievances.
  6. the right to defend oneself, one's liberty and other rights, specifically through keeping and bearing arms.
  7. the right to be secure in one's person, house, papers, and effects against unreasonable searches and seizures.
  8. the right to have Warrants issued only upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
  9. the right to not be held to answer for a capital, or otherwise infamous crime, unless on a presentment or indictment of a Grand Jury, except in cases arising in the land or naval forces, or in the Militia, when in actual service in time of War or public danger.
  10. the right to not be held in double jeopardy.
  11. the right to not be a witness against oneself.
  12. the right to not be deprived of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law.
  13. the right to not have private property taken for public use, without just compensation.
  14. the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed.
  15. the right to be informed of the nature and cause of any accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses supporting said accusation; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in favor of the accused, and to have the Assistance of Counsel for defense.
  16. the right of trial by jury.
  17. the right to have no fact tried by a jury, be otherwise reexamined in any Court of the United States, than according to the rules of the common law.
Our founders, in their quest to obtain recognition for, and enumeration of, these rights, themselves set the example for the use of force in that quest. The lessons of history were clear to the framers of the Constitution and the Bill of Rights: they understood that whenever and wherever a government assumes the power to violate the rights of its citizens, those who wish to violate those rights will find their way into government, and they will exercise that power. Whether that authority is great or small, they will exercise it. The Second Amendment was written into the Bill of Rights as the Founders' tacit acknowledgement that if sufficient numbers of citizens remain fully and faithfully armed, that that example would not have to be repeated and that their rights would remain secure.

It was when the tyrannical government of their day attempted, by force of arms, to confiscate their weapons, that they resisted with deadly force, in earnest and in numbers.

Therefore, in defense of these rights I proclaim in all solemnity and sobriety, and being of a sound and rational mind, that I will defend the right to keep and bear arms against infringement by government, or its officers. Specifically, any attempt to confiscate arms from law-abiding citizens will be met with armed resistance.

In addition, any law attempting to register or curtail the purchase of firearms by law-abiding citizens will not be obeyed, nor will any law which directly infringes on the exercise of the rights enumerated above by law abiding citizens. Such laws violate the letter and the spirit of America's founding documents and are therefore void. Laws that violate the fundamental principle of a individual's right to his own life are in fact crimes against Man, nature, justice and reason. Any attempt to compel infringement of this fundamental right by means of force of arms will be met with resistance in kind.

In the historic case of Marbury vs. Madison of 1803, then Supreme Court Chief Justice Marshall proclaimed that any "act of the legislature, repugnant to the constitution, is void". This statement makes it clear that any so called "law" or legislative act that attempts to deprive law-abiding citizens of their second amendment rights is itself illegal, null and void and ought to be resisted. In addition, the following statements from the Declaration of Independence make it clear what any liberty-loving, patriotic American citizen's course should be, once the government undertakes to infringe upon, deny, corrupt and trample unalienable rights -- specifically the second amendment, which serves as the great protector of all others.

"That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. "

"But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security."

Therefore, let legislative bodies, judges, officers of the court, presidents, governors, appointed officials, law enforcement officers and all governmental agencies and elected officials take note: You who have taken a solemn oath to defend, uphold and protect the Constitution and Rights enumerated therein; Violation and infringement of citizen's unalienable rights, and specifically the Second Amendment rights to keep and bear arms, will occur at your peril. Specifically, confiscation of firearms from law-abiding citizens, will be met with armed resistance, so help me God.
Proclaimed and Signed, this 31st Day of August, 2000

Jeff Head
Emmett, Idaho